Foundations > The New Card Reader

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Ian’s illustration for the rear of the box: the Unicorn Carthorse tramples the wicket, while Rain prepares to attack John Bull riding No Bull
Ian’s illustration for the rear of the box: the Unicorn Carthorse tramples the wicket, while Rain prepares to attack John Bull riding No Bull
 
 
To Summarize: Rainring is an attempt – and not of course the first – to produce some sort of working map of the influences in play wherever there is human activity. Such influences range from macro, impersonally affecting all psychic life, to micro, the vagaries of the unique individual’s particular psychic profile. Together, these myriad influences, stretching from elements almost entirely under the control of consciousness and reason, to elements almost entirely inaccessible to either, form the matrix within which the complex interactions which we call social life, whether in leisure, business, conjugal relations, friendship or any other area of psyche, take place. Like any map, it aims to help us find our way about.

Rainring, then, proposes to tell me in what situation I find myself. In other words, it will situate me on the map of the psyche. Is Rainring a useful map; an accurate one? To answer this question, one is obliged to proceed as with any other map. First, I will use it only if I wish to travel in the country it describes. Second, I will test its accuracy, or lack of it, by seeing whether I am able to navigate successfully with it. Having said this, the same strictures apply as to the reading of any other type of map – namely, I will require a certain amount of training or instruction before I am able to use this, for me, hitherto strange device with a modicum of assurance.

In principle, Rainring can give some sort of answer to any question that one may ask it, provided such question touches on matters of psyche. (Personally, I would not put my money on a rank outsider in the 3.30 at Newmarket on the basis of a consultation with the cards.) However, it must immediately be pointed out that there are two difficulties facing the querant (reader of the cards): first, forming the question; second, understanding the answer. Neither of these difficulties is insurmountable. Nonetheless, their existence means that the person approaching the cards for the first time will do so very much as an apprentice, and need to have the motivation to acquire that minimal degree of familiarity with the cards without which no light will be shed on anything. Having said this, there are people who sense, from the very beginning, that there is something there, and this presentiment itself acts as a motive force in making the effort needed to penetrate the world of the psyche and the cards.
 
 
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